What is MTP/MPO Fiber Optic Connector?

MPO (Multi-fiber Pull Off) is the first generation of cartridge-clamped multi-core optical fiber connector designed by NTT Communications Corporation of Japan, and is the name of a multi-core connector manufactured by several companies. MPO connectors are compatible MTP connectors in line with industry standards, which means it is feasible to replace MPO connectors with MTP connectors for better performance. Most of the MPO connectors that follow the old design have very limited performance and can not provide the same high performance as MTP fiber connectors.

 

MTP is a brand registered by USConec, USA. It refers specifically to the unique type of MPO connectors it produces. MTP connector is a high performance MPO connector with multiple innovative designs. Compared with general MPO connector, MTP fiber connector has been enhanced in optical and mechanical performance. MTP connectors fully meet the professional standards of all MPO connectors, including EIA/TIA-604-5 FOCIS 5 and IEC-61754-7.MTP/MPO backbone fiber optic connector and branch connector are two common types of MTP/MPO fiber optic connector.

 

1. MTP/MPO backbone optical fiber connector

 

MTP/MPO backbone optical fiber jumpers are connected by MTP/MPO connectors at both ends, which are often used for backbone routing in data centers. MTP/MPO backbone optical fiber hoppers are permanent connections of MTP/MPO modules, which can flexibly change the connection form in the optical fiber panel. MTP/MPO backbone optical fiber jumpers are often used together with MTP/MPO transfer module boxes to realize interconnection and cross-connection between network devices.

 

2. MTP/MPO Branch Optical Fiber Connector

 

MTP/MPO branch fiber optic jumper is that one end of the cable is connected with MTP/MPO connector and the other end is connected with single/duplex connector. This kind of fiber optic jumper is suitable for the wiring between 10G network equipment and 40/100G equipment. MTP/MPO branch fiber hopping can provide transitional effect, mainly from single fiber hopping to multiple fiber hopping or duplex connectors.

Differences between MTP and MPO Connectors

At present, there are mainly two kinds of multi-core connectors, MTP and MPO. The differences are as follows:

 

1. MPO (Multi-fiber Push On) is one of MT series connectors. MPO has two different standards: IEC-61754-7 and TIA-604-5 (FOCIS5).

 

2. MTP is a registered MPO fiber optic connector brand produced by US Conec Company in the United States. Its multi-core connector parts and sockets are specially called MTP connectors.

 

3. MPO fiber optic connectors are manufactured by many manufacturers with different brands.

 

4. MTP and MPO fiber optic connectors are in line with the international standard IEC-61754-7 and the American standard TIA-604-5 (FOCIS5). The interchangeability is considered in the structural design. Even though the appearance is different, MTP and MPO connectors can be interconnected in use. Attention must be paid to the connection between the head and the mother.

 

5. MTP and MPO adapters are csommon. The appearance of the two adapters is different.

Things You Need to Know About MTP/MPO Harness Cable

A MTP/MPO harness cable, also called MTP/MPO breakout cable or MTP/MPO fan-out cable, is a fiber optic cable terminated with MTP/MPO connectors on one end and MTP/MPO/LC/FC/SC/ST/MTRJ connectors (generally MTP to LC) on the other end (as shown in the following figure). In addition to its definition, here are something you also need to know about MTP/MPO harness cable.

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MTP/MPO Connector

 

As a kind of multi-fiber connector, the MTP/MPO connector is most commonly used for 12 or 24 fibers in a single connector pushing up to and beyond 100Gbps data transmission. Thus it satisfies the huge demand for more bandwidth and more space efficiency of data centers and ever-expanding server clusters. MTP/MPO connectors are paving the way for increased data transmission speeds and rack density.Though MTP and MPO are literally different from each other, they are often used interchangeably. The MPO connector is a multi-fiber connector that is defined by IEC-61754-7, and the MTP is a registered trade mark of US Conec (a leader in providing passive components for high density optical interconnects), which identifies a specific brand of the MPO style connector.

 

Common Types of MTP/MPO Harness Cable

 

As mentioned above, the connectors on each end of the fiber cable may be the same or not. Thus, the MTP/MPO harness cable is usually divided into MPO/MTP-MPO/MTP harness cable, MPO/MTP-Secure Keyed LC harness cable and MPO/MTP-Standard LC/FC/SC/ST/MTRJ harness cable. In the MPO/MTP-Secure Keyed LC harness cable, the secure keyed LC connector provides a quick, simple termination method, featuring a pre-installed cleaved fiber with an index-matching splice element, and a precision factory pre-polished zirconia ceramic ferrule.

 

Differences Between MTP/MPO Harness Cable and MTP/MPO Trunk Cable

 

MTP/MPO harness cables and MTP/MPO trunk cables are two common kinds of MTP/MPO fiber cables. They differ from each other in such aspects as function and application.

 

MTP/MPO harness cables are designed for high density applications requiring high performance and speedy installation. Harness cables provide a transition from multi-fiber cables to individual fibers or duplex connectors. Therefore, they can meet a variety of fiber cabling requirements.

 

MTP/MPO trunk cables are designed for high density applications which offer excellent benefits in terms of on-site installation time and space saving. Trunk cables serve as a permanent link connecting the MTP/MPO modules to each other.

MTP/MPO Fiber Patch Cord Overview

A MTP/MPO fiber patch cord is a fiber optic cable capped at either end with MTP/MPO connectors, which can be connected to an optical switch, cable television (CATV) or other telecommunication equipment rapidly and conveniently. It is ideally suited for a high density environment that demands space saving and innovative cable management solutions. Since the MTP/MPO fiber patch cord is composed of MTP/MPO connectors and a fiber optic cable, this article will firstly introduce the MTP/MPO connectors and then discuss common kinds of MTP/MPO fiber cables.

 

MTP/MPO Connectors

 
Though MTP and MPO are literally different from each other, they often be used interchangeably. According to CommScope (a famous multinational telecommunications company), the MPO connector is a multi-fiber connector that is defined by IEC-61754-7, and the MTP is a registered trade mark of US Conec (a leader in providing passive components for high density optical interconnects), which identifies a specific brand of the MPO style connector. In other words, the MTP product complies with the MPO standard. Therefore, the MTP connector is a MPO connector.

 

As a kind of multi-fiber connector, the MTP/MPO connector is most commonly used for 12 or 24 fibers (as shown in the following figure) in a single connector pushing up to and beyond 100Gbps data transmission. Thus it satisfied the huge demand for more bandwidth and more space efficiency of data centers and ever-expanding server clusters. The best part is that this kind of connector takes roughly the same space as a single simplex SC connector. MTP/MPO connectors are paving the way for increased data transmission speeds and rack density.

 

Popular MTP/MPO Fiber Cables

 

The most commonly used MTP/MPO fiber cables are MTP/MPO trunk cables and MTP/MPO harness cables.

 

MTP/MPO trunk cables are designed for high density application which offers excellent benefits in terms on-site installation time and space saving. Trunk cables serve as a permanent link connecting the MTP/MPO modules to each other. Theoretically, trunk cables are available with 12, 24, 48 and 72 fibers. Their ends are terminated with the customer’s choice of 12-fiber or 24-fiber MTP/MPO connectors (as shown in the following figure).

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MTP/MPO harness cables are designed for high density applications requiring high performance and speedy installation. Harness cables provide a transition from multi-fiber cables to individual fibers or duplex connectors. The MTP/MPO harness cables are terminated with MTP/MPO connectors on one end and standard LC/FC/SC/ST/MTRJ connectors (generally MTP to LC) on the other end (as shown in the following figure). Therefore, they can meet a variety of fiber cabling requirements.

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Designed for the reliable and quick operations in data centers, the MTP/MPO fiber patch cord is an important part of the multi-fiber connection system. The obvious benefits of this kind of fiber patch cord are less space requirements and improved scalability. Furthermore, it also provides significant space and cost savings.

Global Fiber Module Market is Towards 200G/400G

200G/400G Becomes the Mainstream of Next Generation Data Center

 

Another predictable trend in the data center optical interconnection market is the phasing out of low-speed optical modules in core networks and data centers, with a major shift from 10G to 40G and higher 40G to 100G. The new development of 100G optical devices paves the way for 200G/400G optical devices. The next generation of data centers will deploy 200G/400G Ethernet by the end of 2018 and become the mainstream in 2019 or 2020.

 

Overall, the optical module market is moving towards higher speed, lower power consumption and smaller shape or size. Let’s take a look at these future-oriented optical modules.

 

SFP-DD small automatic pluggable double-density packaging optical module doubles the bandwidth of SFP28 or SFP56 (25G/50G), supports higher rate (50G/100G) while maintaining backward compatibility of SFP28 or SFP56.

 

QSFP-DD four-channel small pluggable double-density packaged optical module, defined by QSFP-DD MSA group, doubles the density of QSFP28 or QSFP56. It has eight channels with a speed of up to 25G or 50G per channel, thus supporting 200G or 400G optical transmission.

 

DAC and AOC seize the market by cost

 

DAC and AOC have the inherent advantages of enhancing signal integrity and excellent flexibility, and have become the first choice for high-speed links (such as 10G, 25G, 40G/100G and 200G/400G). This economical and efficient interconnection solution is suitable for all large-scale data center network and enterprise network applications.

 

DAC and AOC provide higher speed and cost efficiency, and they are witnessing tremendous growth in the data interconnection market. In 2017, more than 100,000 DAC cables were shipped in the 100G network for ultra-large data centers worldwide, and in 2018, the number of DAC cables continued to grow. Meanwhile, AOC’s global market is expected to exceed $2 billion by 2020, and sales will continue to grow substantially in the coming years.

 

conclusion

 

Demand for optical modules in data centers will continue to soar. With the dramatic increase of Internet traffic driving the optical module market to change, we can still expect to deploy 10G, 25G, 40G and 100G Ethernet in large data centers and 200G/400G in the next generation cloud data centers to stimulate market growth. Moreover, low-cost and low-power DAC and AOC based on optical module design are also growing significantly in the application of short-distance high-speed interconnection. Therefore, there are still great opportunities in the optical module market.

A Brief Introduction of DAC Cable

Fiber optic patch cable, also known as fiber jumper, is a fiber optic cable terminated with fiber optic connectors on both ends. And it is widely used in the connections between network equipment. In recent years, a kind of fiber optic patch cable which can transmit data at a high data rate with low cost is popular with data center users. That’s DAC cable or Direct Attach Cable, and this passage will focus on DAC cable’s overview, type and feature.

 

Overview of DAC Cable

 

Direct attach cable is a form of high speed cable with two connectors on either end which are in the form of optical transceiver module, such as SFP+, QSFP+ and so on, but they not real optical transceiver modules. Direct attach cable can support Ethernet, Infiniband, Fibre Channel and other protocols. And it is mainly used for the connection between switches, servers, routers in the interconnection application of racks. As a cost-effective solution in short reach applications, DAC is usually used in equipment distribution area (shown as the figure below).

 

Types of DAC Cable

 

Seen from the material of the cable, DAC can be classified into direct attach copper cable and active optical cable (AOC). Direct attach copper cable can either be passive or active, while AOC cable is always active. The following part will separately give an overview of passive direct attach copper cable, active direct attach cable and active optical cable.

 

Passive Direct Attach Copper Cable

 

Shown as the figure below, the connectors of passive direct attach copper cable contain no active components. The passive direct attach copper cable provides a direct electrical connection between corresponding cable ends and it can reach the transmission distance of 7m at a data rate of 10 Gbps or 40 Gbps with low power consumption.

 

Active Direct Attach Copper Cable

 

Compared with passive direct attach copper cable, the connectors of active direct attach copper cable contain active components, such as cable drive, to transmit and receive electric signals. Therefore, the active direct attach copper cable consumes more power. While these active components help to improve signal quality and provide a longer cable distance. For example, the active direct attach copper cable can reach the transmission distance of 15m at a data rate of 10 Gbps or 40 Gbps.

 

Active Optical Cable

 

The material of AOC’s cable is fiber optic cable and the connectors of active optical cable contain active components, such as rear stage magnifying glass, laser driver and so on. As a result, the transmission distance of active optical cable is much longer than passive direct attach copper cable and active direct attach copper cable’s. Usually, the active optical cable can transmit signals up to 100m.

 

Feature

 

From the content above, we can easily find that with different components inside connectors, different types of direct attach cables have different features. This part will give a detailed introduction about direct attach copper cable and active optical cable’s features.

 

For direct attach copper cable:

 

It supports higher data rates than traditional copper interfaces from 4 Gbps to 10 Gbps per channel.

 

It is interchangeable and hot swappable with fiber optical modules.

 

It is a cost-effective solution over optical transceivers and cables or short reach applications.

 

It supports multiple protocols, such as Gigabit & 10G Ethernet, 8G FC, FCoE, InfiniBand SDR, DDR & QDR.

 

For active optical cable:

 

It is an alternative to optical transceivers which eliminates the separable interface between transceiver module and optical cable.

 

Needing no equipment upgrades, it has a throughput of up to 40 Gbps with QSFP+; it weighs less than a comparable direct attach copper cable.

 

It is immune to electromagnetic energy because the optical fiber is a kind of dielectric (not able to conduct electric current).

 

 

What is a fibre optic cable?

Optical fiber is a waveguide for light. The primary application for such fiber is telecommunications – and their capacity is tremendous.

 

Optical fiber (OEMfiber.com)is two parts/sections of glass; the core and the cladding, and it’s the boundary between the two that guides light along the axis of the fiber. Coatings are applied to the fiber to protect it as just little scratches will create a place for the fiber to crack or split/break. Other than that, and obviously bending fiber to too-tight a radius and breaking it, fiber is surprisingly strong.
Fiber starts its life as a cylindrical tube, but the moment that tube is melted & drawn into fiber, it’s solid, too, so don’t get confused by that please.

 

Two types, essentially, of fiber is used in telecom: Multi-mode & single-mode. A “mode” is the path a ray of light can take within the fiber. Multi-mode fiber has a large core diameter (50 or 65 microns) and so allows simpler/easier coupling of light into the fiber. This ease simplifies components (connectors, light sources) and helps keep costs down for relatively short spans of fiber (modal dispersion limits transmission rates/distances). Single-mode fiber has a very small core (9 microns) that complicates the precision needed for light sources & connectors but also allows tremendous speeds & distances by minimizing/eliminating the effects that cause the trouble in multi-mode fiber. Now the higher cost for single-mode fiber, connectors and sources (lasers) goes way up, but this more than offsets the reduction in costs of duplicated equipment that would be necessary to go similar distances with multi-mode transmission. Single-mode fiber wins easily the distance & rate contest.

 

Plus, single-mode systems can carry more than one wavelength in each fiber. CWDM or DWDM (Coarse- or Dense-Wavelength Division Multiplexing) can combine, currently, about 100 channels into a single fiber (that’s DWDM there). (Multi-mode fiber can carry more than one wave, too, but why bother? The spans are so short that it’s a lot cheaper & easier to just have more fiber.) The real trick, besides the finely tuned lasers, is taking the wavelengths apart at the far end.

 

(There are transmitter/receiver pairs that do, in fact, have multiple wavelengths useful in MM or SM fiber, but they’re dedicated to each other to make up some forms of 100GB transmission paths. The CWDM & DWDM systems mentioned above allow individual wavelengths to be added or dropped from the overall path.)

CRU: Overview of the global fiber optic cable industry in 2018 and an outlook for 2019

Recently, CRU (UK Commodity Research Institute) released the global fiber optic cable industry overview in 2018 and proposed a prospect in 2019. The fiber optic cable industry in 2018 is mixed. The good news is that the number of fixed- line broadband subscribers in the world exceeds 1 billion. However, after the global fiber-optic cable market has achieved double-digit growth for four years, demand in 2018 has only increased by 4% year-on-year. This is the lowest growth rate since 2003. CRU believes that the main reason for the slowdown in growth is due to the downturn in the Chinese market.

 

As mentioned above, the slowdown in the global fiber optic cable market is due to the downturn in the Chinese market, and when it comes to the downturn in the Chinese market, CRU believes that China Mobile’s acquisition volume in the first half of 2018 is lower than the planned purchase volume at the time of bidding. It is reported that in the first half of 2018, China Mobile announced a 110 million-kilometer cable collection project. At that time, it was widely expected that China Mobile’s annual collection will reach 200 million core kilometers, but China Mobile did not conduct mining in the second half of the year.

 

According to CRU, in fact, China Mobile’s fiber optic cable usage in 2018 is much lower than that of the collection. It is not clear whether the mobile has completed the purchase of 110 million core kilometers. At the end of 2018, some suppliers indicated that they had completed the project in the fourth quarter of last year, but one supplier said that China Mobile is still placing orders under this contract. In addition, China Mobile has not announced its 2019 tender, and CRU expects many provincial operators to fully absorb the accumulated inventory at the end of 2017 and the year of 2018.

 

In the global market, French telecom operator Orange and other operators involved in FTTH (Fiber to the Home) business said that they completed the construction of FTTH one year ahead of schedule, and the demand for fiber optic cable in France increased by 33% in 2018, making France a Second only to China, the United States and India’s fourth largest market in the world. In the Indian market, cable demand increased by 19% thanks to the BharatNet broadband plan. CRU said that although major markets such as Western Europe, North America and India have maintained strong growth under the stimulus of large-scale FTTx deployment plans, they are still not enough to offset the decline in the Chinese market.

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Why use MPO/MTP distribution boxes in data center cabling?

The MTP/MPO distribution box dominates the high-density cabling environment. It is a high-density pre-terminated fiber optic device with flexible deployment that not only provides conversion between MTP/MPO connectors and LC or SC connectors. To help high-density networks achieve rapid deployment, and to reduce the installation time and cost of optical networks.

 
The MTP/MPO distribution box has these advantages:

 
1. Simple installation / saving installation time: MTP / MPO distribution box is a pre-terminated product, and uses a push-pull mechanism to facilitate the insertion and removal of cables, and can also eliminate unpredictable terminal failures. It is estimated that the installation time of MPO/MTP distribution boxes can be reduced by 75% compared to conventional fiber-optic cabling systems.

 

2. Easy to maintain and manage: MTP/MPO distribution box can adapt to changing wiring environment. When the connector changes, just replace the cable, and the other basic equipment of the network does not change, so MTP/MPO is equipped with Wire boxes are easier to maintain and manage, and the security risks are lower.

 

3. High Density: Since the MTP/MPO connector can accommodate 12/24-core fiber, it can provide 12/24 times density, which can increase wiring density while saving wiring space.

 

4. Cost Saving: As mentioned above, the MTP/MPO distribution box is easy to install and requires no additional installers to install it professionally, thus greatly reducing installation costs.

 

5. Scalability: The MTP/MPO distribution box is modular in design and can be quickly connected to devices with various speeds such as 10G/40G/100G, which is also easy to reconfigure when running and expanding the network. It is very important to say.

What is single mode fiber and multimode fiber?

What is a single mode fiber?

 

Single mode fiber: The center glass core is very thin (the core diameter is generally 9 or 10 μm) and can only transmit one mode of fiber. Therefore, its inter-mode dispersion is small and suitable for remote communication.

 

Multimode fiber patch cords are multimode fiber optic cables with connectors at both ends for connection from the device to the fiber optic cabling link. They have a thicker protective layer and are typically used between the optical transceiver and the terminal box. connection. Multimode fiber allows different modes of light to be transmitted over a single fiber. Because of the large core diameter of the multimode fiber, relatively inexpensive couplers and connectors can be used. The core diameter of the multimode fiber is 50 μm to 100 μm.

 

What is the difference between single mode fiber and multimode fiber?

 

1: light source

 

Single-mode fiber uses a solid-state laser as a light source; multi-mode fiber uses a light-emitting diode as a light source;

 

2: Broadband

 

Single mode fiber has a long transmission bandwidth and a long transmission distance, but because of its need for a laser source, the cost is high; multimode fiber has a low transmission speed and a short distance, but its cost is relatively low;

 

3: diameter

 

Multimode fibers are typically 50 or 62.5 μm core diameter, while typical single mode fibers are 8 and 10 μm core diameters, both of which have a cladding diameter of 125 μm.

 

4: Dispersion

 

Single-mode fiber core diameter and dispersion are small, allowing only one mode of transmission; multimode fiber core diameter and dispersion are large, allowing hundreds of modes of transmission.